Entrees

Today Kristen of It’s a Lifestyle, LLC contributes a great recipe for a winter weekend. This chicken soup is an easy-to-make, one-pot dinner. Take it away, Kristen!  This easy-to-make chicken soup is inexpensive and provides leftovers that can be individually frozen for future meals. This is not your grandmother’s chicken soup. Yes, the basics are there, but with added twists. Sometimes when I make this, I use whatever I have in the fridge. You can substitute according to your own tastes, adding eggplant, tricolor peppers, and other veggies you might have around. small-medium whole chicken (should fit into your crockpot) […]

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By Riki Shore Earlier this week I was singing the praises of the local wild fish and seafood available in North Carolina. I would be remiss if I didn’t also talk about pigs in this state. North Carolina is, of course, renowned for its BBQ, a pulled pork variety that gets doused in a chile-spiked vinegar sauce. When it’s done well, it’s delicious. It can also be a very affordable, gluten-free dinner out, so I’ve always opted not to tackle it in my own kitchen. But my local butcher counter boasts all kinds of local pork cuts: loins, chops, shoulders, […]

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By Riki Shore One of the greatest things about living in North Carolina is the availability of wild fish and seafood from just off the coast. Some of the best shrimp I’ve eaten has been in NC; ditto wild flounder. I like both of those options, but I was thrilled to find one of my favorite oily fishes at my local fish counter last week. Spanish mackerel are related to the King mackerel, but grow to only 2  – 3 pounds. They have white oily flesh and silver skin spotted with yellow olive-shaped dots. According to FishWatch, Spanish mackerel are an […]

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Classic Chicken Salad

January 21, 2012

in Entrees,Recipes

By Riki Shore Sometimes you need some comfort food. Like maybe after a cross-country move? When you’re still jet-lagged, not used to the new house or the cold weather? For me, chicken salad has always been a comforting lunch. Yesterday I roasted a couple of chicken breasts while unpacking some boxes. Then I mixed up a very simple, classic chicken salad. This was partially because I hadn’t unpacked any spices yet, and partially because I was craving simplicity. I dressed a bed of greens with mustard vinaigrette and topped it with chicken salad. This afternoon I topped the whole shebang with dried cranberries […]

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By Riki Shore As I write this, the Southern California sun is streaming in my dining room, bleaching everything it touches and raising the indoor temps to above 80 degrees. Crazy for January, no? And yet, I’m craving beef stew. It must be all the East Coast winters of my childhood that make me crave cold-weather dishes at this time of year. This stew is inspired by a recipe in Michael Psilakis’ wonderful cookbook How to Roast a Lamb. Everything I’ve made from that book is incredible, but he often calls for a long list of ingredients. I’ve simplified his […]

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By Riki Shore This time of year is packed with celebrations: birthdays, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s and, of course, Hanukkah. Growing up, Hanukkah meant we didn’t celebrate Christmas. We didn’t eat cookies, or candy canes, or chocolates, or even little oranges. We didn’t get an enormous tree and decorate it with sparkling lights and delicate ornaments. We didn’t get extravagant gifts like new cars, jewelry or bikes. We didn’t even get a present each night for eight nights. We got dreidels and, sometimes, Hanukkah gelt. We got a practical present on the first night, and most of the time a […]

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By Riki Shore I’ve been lucky enough to eat at the Lazy Ox twice in recent weeks and, although my bank account has suffered, my food inspiration has definitely ratcheted up a notch. One of the mind-blowing dishes I ate there was simply described on the menu as seared fijian albacore with lentils, bacon & apple. I detected syrupy balsamic vinegar and kumquat; the waiter told me there was bacon and pickled apple; and there was definitely a shaving of fennel and what seemed like a golden raisin. It was a complex dish, hitting all the right notes with tastes familiar […]

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By Riki Shore Someone around here turned 40 last week (not me – that already happened!) and it was an occasion for special foods. I came up with a menu that was doable and delicious – perfect for a birthday, but also a great holiday meal. Braised Asian short ribs, inspired by a recipe in Simple to Spectacular by Jean-Georges Vongerichten and Mark Bittman, were the centerpiece of the meal. Although the short ribs cook for 3 hours, it’s largely unattended time in the oven, which means you can be setting the table, wrapping presents, or prepping an appetizer. We ate […]

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By Riki Shore Any soy sauce-based marinade is delicious with steak; I remember buying bottles of Soy Vay at the grocery store when I was growing up. It appealed to my Jewish family and, let’s face it, it tasted delicious. I recently went about trying to recreate the flavor of Soy Vay using a recipe for a Filipino-style marinade by Steven Raichlen. The results were amazing. I reserved half of the marinade to use as a dipping sauce – everyone loved it. The next night we drizzled the dregs over roast chicken and it was just as good. I served […]

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By Riki Shore Now that Fall is here, we’re roasting winter squash several times a week. And why not? They’re affordable, filling and nutritious. Spaghetti squash is a great one to turn to when you’re craving noodles. It’s humongous (that’s only half of one in the photo above) and makes great leftovers. Like most winter squash, it’s super nutritious, being high in vitamins C and B6, as well as niacin, potassium and manganese. It takes time to roast a spaghetti squash, but it’s a simple process. Once it’s cool enough to handle you “comb” the strands of roasted squash with […]

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