beef

Up here in Scotland we’re in the middle of what one friend calls “the tunnel”. Back in November I bumped into him on the street in St. Andrews. He said, “We’ve entered the tunnel. We won’t come out until February.” Northern living is challenging at this time of year. The mornings are dark – pitch dark, bump-into-walls-while-making-coffee dark. The afternoons are even darker. Light seeps into the sky around 8:45 and starts to drain out again by 3:30. I’ve never been so acutely aware of the winter solstice. We actually count the days we achieved since December 21st. The good […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

This time of year all I want to do is cook on the grill. We’ve been lucky in North Carolina. We’ve had a true spring, complete with cool days and warm breezes and, for the most part, an absence of mosquitoes. It’s about to change, but right now, the weather is perfect for ducking out the back door and throwing a steak on a hot grill. Skirt steak works well with all kinds of marinades, but especially those that contain citrus, vinegar or tamari. The acid in the marinade helps break down the tough fibers of the steak, making the […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

We’ve been super busy lately, traveling, reading, exploring and visiting friends and cousins. We’ve been to Boston, where we dipped our fingers in the new shark and ray touch-tank at the New England Aquarium; gazed awestruck at the modern Alex Katz prints and ancient gemstone jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts; and got thoroughly inspired by the mechanical sculpture of Arthur Ganson at the MIT Museum. We’ve been picking strawberries (for sorbet) and house-sitting the baby chicks from Stella’s UNC science class. We’ve tried to get in some stargazing, but the weather hasn’t complied…maybe it will for the Venus […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Porterhouse Steak

April 22, 2012

in Entrees,Recipes

By Riki Shore One of the best things about homeschooling is that we can do what we want when we want. Last year Rob travelled about every eight weeks and we almost never tagged along because of Stella’s school schedule. This year we decided to change that. When Rob began planning a week in Washington, DC, I started plotting out a week’s worth of free museums and monuments, and visits with cousins. Last week in DC we managed to see the Lincoln Memorial, the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial, the White House, as well as the Hope Diamond at the Museum of […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Asian Beef Braise

March 20, 2012

in Entrees,Recipes

By Riki Shore The other day I was flipping through an issue of Food & Wine when I came across a recipe for Asian beef shanks. It called for browning the shanks, then cooking them on the stovetop, but I immediately thought I could adapt it to the slow cooker. Doing so meant I could prep it in the morning and come home to a fully prepared meal at dinnertime. A lot of Asian-inspired dishes are a balance of sweet and savory, achieved by adding sugar to marinades and sauces. This particular recipe (most likely more American than Asian) called […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

By Riki Shore We’ve had so many days in the 50s and 60s this winter, it almost hasn’t felt like winter at all. But today snow is in the forecast and the mercury isn’t rising above 40. Given that it’s Sunday afternoon with nothing much to do, it’s a perfect day to make chicken stock, roast some vegetables, or stir up a pot of beef stew. About two weeks ago we were invited to a potluck where the host had a pot simmering on the stove. The whole house was filled with the aroma of spices like cinnamon, cloves and […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

By Riki Shore As I write this, the Southern California sun is streaming in my dining room, bleaching everything it touches and raising the indoor temps to above 80 degrees. Crazy for January, no? And yet, I’m craving beef stew. It must be all the East Coast winters of my childhood that make me crave cold-weather dishes at this time of year. This stew is inspired by a recipe in Michael Psilakis’ wonderful cookbook How to Roast a Lamb. Everything I’ve made from that book is incredible, but he often calls for a long list of ingredients. I’ve simplified his […]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }