citrus

Back in May, just before we moved to Scotland, Saveur ran an article that featured a Corsican chestnut cake. The article talked about how chestnuts are the prize crop of Corsica, the mountainous Mediterranean island that claims to be the birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte and Christopher Columbus. David McAninch, the article’s author, was more interested in gastronomy than history, entitling his article Pleasure Island. Corsican flavors run towards a plethora of local ingredients: wild game stews, pungent soft cheeses, fish soups, and fragrant herbs. Desserts almost always call into service the citrus and chestnuts that grow in abundance on the […]

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These days I’m restless and bored with cooking. I need new inspiration and new dishes. Usually when this happens I start perusing my cookbooks, but right now, my cookbooks are packed into a container ship heading to the UK, along with all my other earthly belongings. That’s right – we’re moving to Scotland in a few weeks. We’ll be living in a little cottage on a 1200 acre cattle farm outside of St Andrews. If you Google the address, you see a map with a lot of green and some tiny white dots. Zoom in, and those dots turn into […]

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By Riki Shore My policy these days is to not eat dessert unless it’s a special occasion. Luckily, those come around fairly often! This past weekend we celebrated my mother’s birthday with a true Sunday lunch. We had a rack of lamb roasted with herbs and garlic, roasted asparagus and kabocha squash. For dessert, I made a coffee ice cream (my mom’s favorite), but it didn’t turn out as well as I would have liked. Thankfully, I made a second dessert, as I’m wont to do, and it was outstanding – a strawberry sorbet made with berries that Stella and […]

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By Riki Shore When I first moved to LA, now two years ago, I had a great lunch at Little Flower Candy Company. It was a simple salmon salad accented with thin slices of pickled kumquat. I had never eaten pickled kumquat before that lunch and the way the teensy slivers packed an enormous punch of flavor astounded me. I’ve wanted to make pickled kumquats ever since. In LA, kumquats, like all citrus, grow all over the place. It’s easy to find yourself with a pound of the jewel-like fruits for free, handed over by a friend or neighbor. In […]

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By Riki Shore One of the greatest things about living in North Carolina is the availability of wild fish and seafood from just off the coast. Some of the best shrimp I’ve eaten has been in NC; ditto wild flounder. I like both of those options, but I was thrilled to find one of my favorite oily fishes at my local fish counter last week. Spanish mackerel are related to the King mackerel, but grow to only 2 ¬†– 3 pounds. They have white oily flesh and silver skin spotted with yellow olive-shaped dots. According to FishWatch,¬†Spanish mackerel are an […]

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By Riki Shore Compound butter is butter flavored with herbs, spices, salt, lemon, miso or yes, even anchovy. Especially anchovy. Most American butter is about 80% fat, and fat is a substance that allows flavors to bloom. Strong flavors, like anchovy, do well when mixed with butter. The flavor intensifies, but the fat in the butter softens the mouth feel and makes a strongly flavored food even more appetizing. The first recipe below, thyme-lemon butter, is delicious on grilled chicken and salmon. It’s inspired by Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Food and is open to your interpretation. You can […]

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By Riki Shore Kelly Coyne and Erik Knutzen of the Root Simple blog just published their second book, Making It: Radical Home Ec for a Post-Consumer World, which features DIY projects for anyone interested in moving even part of their life off-grid. Coyne and Knutzen live smack in the middle of Los Angeles, a city that has more inhabitants than 23 of the states in our country, yet they have managed to live as though they were pioneering on the North Dakota plains. They make their own bath soap and household cleaning products; they raise their own chickens and keep […]

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By Riki Shore The other day a friend gave me a huge bag of tangerines from her tree. (This is the same friend who gives me Meyer lemons and Haas avocadoes – not a bad friend at all!) There were so many tangerines and they were so ripe, I knew I had to come up with a recipe that would put them to good use quickly. Tangerine sorbet sounded fun and refreshing, and star anise ups the flavor intrigue. I served scoops unadorned to kids; for the adults, I drizzled each scoop with some chilled Moscato D’Aosti sparkling wine. It […]

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By Riki Shore When I was a kid, my mom used to make stuffed Cornish game hens for special occasions. Even though I didn’t love eating chicken, I adored getting a whole bird on my plate, filled with aromatic spices and dried fruits. The birds were juicy and delicious. Healthy Family Farms sells Cornish game hens most weeks at our farmer’s market, and they are a reasonable price if you’re not trying to feed a crowd. We shared one bird and served it with roasted carrots and a green salad. The whole dinner for three of us cost less than […]

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By Riki Shore This simple chicken recipe looks elegant and tastes great. Serve it with your favorite grilled vegetables (here shown with zucchini, yellow crookneck squash, red onion and garlic) and steamed rice, and save leftovers for a tasty lunch. If you don’t have kumquat marmalade, substituting apricot preserves works just as well. CHICKEN 2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1. Pound chicken breasts between two layers of wax paper until 1/4 inch thick. 2. Place chicken in a […]

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