meat

Up here in Scotland we’re in the middle of what one friend calls “the tunnel”. Back in November I bumped into him on the street in St. Andrews. He said, “We’ve entered the tunnel. We won’t come out until February.” Northern living is challenging at this time of year. The mornings are dark – pitch dark, bump-into-walls-while-making-coffee dark. The afternoons are even darker. Light seeps into the sky around 8:45 and starts to drain out again by 3:30. I’ve never been so acutely aware of the winter solstice. We actually count the days we achieved since December 21st. The good […]

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We’ve been super busy lately, traveling, reading, exploring and visiting friends and cousins. We’ve been to Boston, where we dipped our fingers in the new shark and ray touch-tank at the New England Aquarium; gazed awestruck at the modern Alex Katz prints and ancient gemstone jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts; and got thoroughly inspired by the mechanical sculpture of Arthur Ganson at the MIT Museum. We’ve been picking strawberries (for sorbet) and house-sitting the baby chicks from Stella’s UNC science class. We’ve tried to get in some stargazing, but the weather hasn’t complied…maybe it will for the Venus […]

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Porterhouse Steak

April 22, 2012

in Entrees,Recipes

By Riki Shore One of the best things about homeschooling is that we can do what we want when we want. Last year Rob travelled about every eight weeks and we almost never tagged along because of Stella’s school schedule. This year we decided to change that. When Rob began planning a week in Washington, DC, I started plotting out a week’s worth of free museums and monuments, and visits with cousins. Last week in DC we managed to see the Lincoln Memorial, the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial, the White House, as well as the Hope Diamond at the Museum of […]

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Asian Beef Braise

March 20, 2012

in Entrees,Recipes

By Riki Shore The other day I was flipping through an issue of Food & Wine when I came across a recipe for Asian beef shanks. It called for browning the shanks, then cooking them on the stovetop, but I immediately thought I could adapt it to the slow cooker. Doing so meant I could prep it in the morning and come home to a fully prepared meal at dinnertime. A lot of Asian-inspired dishes are a balance of sweet and savory, achieved by adding sugar to marinades and sauces. This particular recipe (most likely more American than Asian) called […]

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By Riki Shore We’ve had so many days in the 50s and 60s this winter, it almost hasn’t felt like winter at all. But today snow is in the forecast and the mercury isn’t rising above 40. Given that it’s Sunday afternoon with nothing much to do, it’s a perfect day to make chicken stock, roast some vegetables, or stir up a pot of beef stew. About two weeks ago we were invited to a potluck where the host had a pot simmering on the stove. The whole house was filled with the aroma of spices like cinnamon, cloves and […]

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By Riki Shore Earlier this week I was singing the praises of the local wild fish and seafood available in North Carolina. I would be remiss if I didn’t also talk about pigs in this state. North Carolina is, of course, renowned for its BBQ, a pulled pork variety that gets doused in a chile-spiked vinegar sauce. When it’s done well, it’s delicious. It can also be a very affordable, gluten-free dinner out, so I’ve always opted not to tackle it in my own kitchen. But my local butcher counter boasts all kinds of local pork cuts: loins, chops, shoulders, […]

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By Riki Shore I have a confession to make: I’d never made beef stock before yesterday. I wasn’t even sure I’d like eating it. But we’d amassed pounds of bones and an enormous knuckle in the freezer, and it was time to do something with them. Thinking of all the healthy gelatin and fat – not to mention flavor – the bones contained, I went looking for a recipe for beef stock. Primal Cuts is an amazing resource for all things meat-related. Compiled by Marissa Guggiana, it features recipes and stories from “America’s best butchers”. Ignoring the butcher-as-sinister-rock-star photos and […]

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By Riki Shore Someone around here turned 40 last week (not me – that already happened!) and it was an occasion for special foods. I came up with a menu that was doable and delicious – perfect for a birthday, but also a great holiday meal. Braised Asian short ribs, inspired by a recipe in Simple to Spectacular by Jean-Georges Vongerichten and Mark Bittman, were the centerpiece of the meal.¬†Although the short ribs cook for 3 hours, it’s largely unattended time in the oven, which means you can be setting the table, wrapping presents, or prepping an appetizer. We ate […]

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By Riki Shore Any soy sauce-based marinade is delicious with steak; I remember buying bottles of Soy Vay at the grocery store when I was growing up. It appealed to my Jewish family and, let’s face it, it tasted delicious. I recently went about trying to recreate the flavor of Soy Vay using a recipe for a Filipino-style marinade by Steven Raichlen. The results were amazing. I reserved half of the marinade to use as a dipping sauce – everyone loved it. The next night we drizzled the dregs over roast chicken and it was just as good. I served […]

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By Riki Shore Now that Fall’s here, I like to prepare hearty salads for lunch. They’re a great way to use leftover meats, and if you have the vinaigrette already on hand, they come together in a snap. I’ve written this recipe to use roasted chicken, but this salad combines just as well with leftover lamb or beef. Puy lentils are also called French green lentils. They’re slightly smaller than other lentils, and although they take a little longer to prepare, they hold their shape well during cooking. The mustard vinaigrette here makes a great all-purpose salad dressing. Feel free […]

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