vegetarian

By Riki Shore Late summer is the time to celebrate corn and all its crunchy sweetness. Arguably one of the best ways to eat it is straight off the cob, preferably grilled – but, hey, a microwaved ear of corn can still be delicious – with butter, sea salt and lime. Corn contains many of the same plant proteins as wheat, which means it can irritate the gut lining and be difficult to digest. You’ll have to determine how much corn is the right amount for you, but I think indulging in a little corn fest when it’s at the […]

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Creamy Dijon Slaw

August 16, 2011

in Recipes,Veggies

By Riki Shore Saveur recently did an entire issue devoted to BBQ, where every recipe was more enticing than the last. We’ve had Carolina ‘cue, Austin brisket, Kansas City ribs, and we’re looking forward to eating some East LA barbacoa. In Saveur’s issue there were pages and pages of side dishes and sauces, all of which looked authentic, and most of which looked worth trying. Above is my take on their Tennessee-Style Mustard Coleslaw. In the picture above, it’s topped with grilled chicken, but it would be even better with sliced grilled Andouille sausage or leftover thinly sliced steak. Experiment […]

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By Riki Shore Everything tastes good with olive oil, salt, garlic and lemon. Even kale. Trust me. If you can’t afford the organic Lacinato kale at the farmer’s market, get the $1.99 bag of tough, mature kale in Trader Joe’s refrigerated case. Even that will taste good in this recipe. I promise. This one is inspired by the James Beard award-winning chef Andrea Reusing, owner of Lantern in Chapel Hill, NC. Oil, garlic and chile is Reusing’s trifecta of flavor, popping up all over her new cookbook Cooking in the Moment. Her recipes are delicious and completely doable for a […]

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By Riki Shore Compound butter is butter flavored with herbs, spices, salt, lemon, miso or yes, even anchovy. Especially anchovy. Most American butter is about 80% fat, and fat is a substance that allows flavors to bloom. Strong flavors, like anchovy, do well when mixed with butter. The flavor intensifies, but the fat in the butter softens the mouth feel and makes a strongly flavored food even more appetizing. The first recipe below, thyme-lemon butter, is delicious on grilled chicken and salmon. It’s inspired by Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Food and is open to your interpretation. You can […]

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By Riki Shore Earlier this year, his 40th, Rob received a high cholesterol reading at his physical. Always healthy, he was shocked to receive this finding. It sent him into a tailspin of lifestyle changes – how often and how intensely he exercises, what he eats and what he avoids in his diet, new herbal medicine and supplements – all to avoid the common consequence of taking a statin. Three months later his total cholesterol was down an astonishing 140 points – landing him safely in no-statin territory. He can address the details of the approach in another post, but […]

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By Riki Shore This recipe is inspired by one I found in David Tanis’ beautiful cookbook A Platter of Figs. I lessened the amount of sugar and increased the cooking time. The resulting compote is more along the consistency of all the wonderful baked fruit desserts that I don’t eat much any more – buckles, fools, cobblers and crisps – because they’re toppings aren’t certified gluten-free. We ate this for dessert with a vanilla-scented whipped cream, and for breakfast the next morning with plain yogurt and a drizzle of maple syrup. 2 pounds rhubarb 12 kumquats 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 […]

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By Riki Shore Asparagus is a special Spring treat, and it’s the current favorite vegetable with a certain 6 year old in our house. I overheard her say to a friend last week, “Don’t you love asparagus?!”. It took a moment for the other kid to answer, somewhat meekly, “Yeah”. Asparagus is the young shoot of a plant in the lily family. It still grows wild in this country, and young wild shoots can be eaten raw, but we buy cultivated asparagus, such as the violet-hued Jersey Giant. It can be an expensive vegetable to serve regularly, with the price of […]

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By Riki Shore While I love to eat freshly made hot meals, the truth is, sometimes I need a snack on-the-go. Our lives, like everyone else’s, are busy and fully lived. A mid-afternoon pick-up that’s packed with protein and healthy fats is an invaluable recipe to have. This recipe is inspired by Elana Amsterdam’s Power Bars, posted on her blog Elana’s Pantry several years ago. I’ve toasted the coconut and added some almond extract to pump up the flavor, and I recommend processing the almond mixture until it’s completely smooth. Mine are also sweetened with Muscovado sugar instead of stevia […]

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By Riki Shore Kumquats are tiny oblong fruits shaped like olives, but with the skin of oranges. They are expensive, full of seeds, and very sour. The best thing is if a friend has a kumquat tree and gives you a big bowl of them and you’re wondering how in the world to eat them. This recipe, adapted from Thomas Keller’s Ad Hoc at Home, uses the natural pectin in the fruit, which helps the marmalade set, and matches it with sugar and tangerines for increased sweetness. Pair this marmalade with cheeses and charcuterie, or use it as a glaze […]

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By Riki Shore This recipe was inspired by the wonderful Greens Cookbook by Deborah Madison and Edward Espe Brown. I take quite a bit of liberty with the ingredients, substituting onion or shallot for the leeks, chicken broth or water for the wine, and spinach or kale for the chard. It’s terrific on its own, or stir in crumbled spicy sausage, chopped bacon, or chopped green olives before serving. Wash well and slice into 1 inch pieces, reserving ribs for another use: 1 bunch of swiss or rainbow chard leaves Trim the root ends and dark green stalks, then slice […]

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